Monthly Archives: March 2017

SCMS conference Chicago

Last week, I was fortunate to be able to attend the annual conference of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, the biggest conference in the world focusing mainly on film. The conference took place in Chicago, which is worth a visit for its Arts Institute and Frank Lloyd Wright architecture alone. I attended several great presentations, and it was a stimulating experience to engage with so many North-American scholars and scholarly work for the first time in my life (hitherto I had only attended European conferences).

panel chicago

Our panel: Petar Mitric, Julia Hammett-Jamart, myself and Marco Cucco

I was part of one of two panels on co-production policies and practices, organized by the International Coproduction Research Network, a consortium of scholars from around the world working on the policies and practices that shape international coproductions. I gave a presentation on Dutch-Belgian coproduction policies from the 1960s until the 1980s, and the role of a Greater-Dutch cultural ideology in this history.

Hopper's nighthawks

Hopper’s Nighthawks at the Arts Institute

IMG_4541

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House

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New article: Film policy & Flemish identity

The latest issue of Communications: The European Journal of Communication Research features my article The role of film production policy in stimulating a Flemish identity (1964–2002). This article is more or less a 10-page summary of my 430-pages PhD thesis. You can read the full text article here.

The article examines the period that starts in 1964, when a selective and culturally inspired support mechanism for feature films was introduced in Flanders, Subsequently, the support system ran until 2002, when it was structurally renewed. The research shows that throughout the course of the second half of the 20th century, there was an evolution in Flemish film policy towards more pluralistic and less essentialist and explicit national discourses, in which national elements, nevertheless, retained an important place.

Day for night

Anke Brouwers

Anke Brouwers introducing Days of Heaven

This weekend, the first edition of Day for night took place, a 24-hour film marathon organized by Cinea, KASKcinema and the Ghent University film club Film-Plateau. With nine films, six introductions, and just very tiny breaks in-between, it may look like a lot of unnecessary suffering for some, but for true cinephiles watching John Ford’s She wore a yellow ribbon, Alfred Hitchcock’s To catch a thief and Terrence Malick’s Days of heaven in a row just feels like… well, like a day and night of heaven.

Dorst naar bloed

French and Dutch-language poster for Daughters of Darkness

I gave an introduction to Harry Kümel’s 1971 Daughters of Darkness, a terrific vampire cult film which succeeds in making the bridge between arthouse and exploitation cinema. Afterwards, the night program continued with Toute une nuit (1982, Chantal Akerman), Night on earth (1991, Jim Jarmusch, 1991), Demoni (1985, Lamberto Bava) and Die hard (1988, John McTiernan). The closing film of the weekend was F.W. Murnau’s beautiful silent film Sunrise (1927).

Wouter Hessels

Wouter Hessels introducing Sunrise

dinner

Appropriate dinner for a film marathon…