Category Archives: Cinema

Publication on Daens

My article ‘From political biography to political event: the Daens myth in literature and cinema’ has just been published in the journal Biography. This article examines how Louis Paul Boon’s historical novel Pieter Daens (1971) and Stijn Coninx’s biopic Daens (1992) have contributed to the ‘Daens myth’, in which the Belgian priest and politician Adolf Daens (1939-1907) is idealized as a self-assured hero fighting social injustice. The article focuses on how Daens is related to Flemish nation-building and how the political biopic became a political event itself. You can read it here.

Daens

 

Loft remakes

The latest issue of the Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschap published an article by Eduard Cuelenaere, Stijn Joye and myself on the Belgian film Loft (2008) and its Dutch (2010) and American (2014) remake. You can read the article here (in Dutch).

loft

Het Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschap publiceerde zonet een artikel van Eduard Cuelenaere, Stijn Joye en mezelf, over de Belgische film Loft (2008) en zijn Nederlandse (2010) en Amerikaanse (2014) remake. Je kan het artikel hier lezen. Het artikel focust op de (re)producties van culturele identiteiten. Via een vergelijkende analyse van representaties van vrouwelijke personages, seksualiteit en etniciteit onderzoeken we hoe verschillende versies van eenzelfde filmverhaal gerelateerd zijn aan hun specifieke socio-culturele contexten, en aan het concept van ‘karaoke-Amerikanisme’.

Il Cinema Repubblica

The ‘Gentse Feesten’ (Ghent Festival), one of Europe’s biggest street festivals, hosts countless cultural events, such as concerts, (street) theater, debates and expositions. Until last year, however, a film event was lacking (although the past has seen some attempts to include open air and other film screenings). Il Cinema Repubblica now provides the Gentse Feesten with a film event to be proud of.  This four day silent film festival (17-20 July) is an initiative of the audiovisual company Republic of Reinvention, in collaboration with Cinematek (the Royal Belgian Film Archive, taking care of the film programming together with Cinea) and the School of Arts Gent (providing the beautiful historical setting of the Miry concert hall in the heart of Ghent).

20180719_200715

Bruno Mestdagh (Cinematek) introducing the films of Alfred Machin

All films are accompanied by live music: the first two days by musicians from the conservatory, the last two days by Hilde Nash, Cinematek’s house pianist. The first day had slapstick films, the second day served some rare copies of the Cinematek, the third day (which I attended last night) focused on the films of Alfred Machin and the fourth day combines a Chaplin classic with an early Italian feminist film and an obscure porn film from 1920. Hopefully Il Cinema Repubblica has come to stay!

Summer Film School Rotterdam

Today was the first day of the Summer Film School Rotterdam, an intensive five-day programme of lectures and film screenings organized by the cinephile platform Roffa Mon Amour in co-operation with Cinea, whose yearly Summer Film College in Antwerp served as an inspiration source. The first edition of the Summer Film School Rotterdam focuses on the work of two very different directors: the provocative American filmmaker Brian de Palma and the French ‘Rive Gauche’ director Alain Resnais. The lectures on Brian de Palma are given by film critics Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin, while Alain Resnais’s films are analyzed by film scholars Patricia Pisters (University of Amsterdam) and Nadine Boljkovac (Falmouth University).

Summer Film School

Patricia Pisters’s lecture on Alain Resnais

The Summer Film School kicked off with a very inspiring lecture by Patricia Pisters. After introducing the serious and the playful Alain Resnais, she provided us with great insights into one of the major threads throughout Resnais’s oeuvre. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze’s writings, Pisters explained the working of and reflections on time and memory in films such as Hiroshima mon amour (1959) and particularly Je t’aime je t’aime (1968). I hadn’t seen this last film yet, and it was a delightful experience (a nice extra was to see all the Belgian references in the film, as it was shot in Ostend and Brussels). After the Resnais part of the day, Cristina Álvarez López gave an excellent introduction to the early works of Brian de Palma. Adrian Martin subsequently introduced de Palma’s cult musical Phantom of the paradise (1974), which was screened afterwards.