Tag Archives: Cinea

Summer Film College 2017

Last week, Cinea (the Flemish Service for Film Culture) organized its yearly Summer Film College (Zomerfilmcollege) in Cinema Zuid in Antwerp. I’ve been attending the Summer Film College since 2009, when it was still taking place in Bruges, and it’s always a pleasure to dive into this week with each day from morning until midnight lectures and films … a true celebration of cinephilia indeed!

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Bart Versteirt (Cinea) interviewing Iranian director Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa about her autobiographical documentary Jerry and Me (2013)

This year’s Summer Film College was dedicated to two themes: the great Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami and US comedy films from the 1930s and 1940s. You can consult the full programme here. Unfortunately, I was only able to attend the two last days, but the lectures by Ruben Demasure, Adrian Martin and Tom Paulus were simply excellent and I enjoyed seeing Trouble in Paradise (1932, Ernst Lubitsch) and Kiarostami’s posthumously finished last film 24 Frames (2017) a lot. Looking forward to next year’s edition!

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Day for night

Anke Brouwers

Anke Brouwers introducing Days of Heaven

This weekend, the first edition of Day for night took place, a 24-hour film marathon organized by Cinea, KASKcinema and the Ghent University film club Film-Plateau. With nine films, six introductions, and just very tiny breaks in-between, it may look like a lot of unnecessary suffering for some, but for true cinephiles watching John Ford’s She wore a yellow ribbon, Alfred Hitchcock’s To catch a thief and Terrence Malick’s Days of heaven in a row just feels like… well, like a day and night of heaven.

Dorst naar bloed

French and Dutch-language poster for Daughters of Darkness

I gave an introduction to Harry Kümel’s 1971 Daughters of Darkness, a terrific vampire cult film which succeeds in making the bridge between arthouse and exploitation cinema. Afterwards, the night program continued with Toute une nuit (1982, Chantal Akerman), Night on earth (1991, Jim Jarmusch, 1991), Demoni (1985, Lamberto Bava) and Die hard (1988, John McTiernan). The closing film of the weekend was F.W. Murnau’s beautiful silent film Sunrise (1927).

Wouter Hessels

Wouter Hessels introducing Sunrise

dinner

Appropriate dinner for a film marathon…