Tag Archives: European cinema

Multivoicedness in European Cinema conference

Conference poster Cork

Today was the first day of the conference Multivoicedness in European Cinema, which I’m organizing together with my colleagues Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork), Sergio Villanueva Baselga (Universitat de Barcelona), and Anders Marklund (University of Lund) (the management team of the ECREA Film Studies section). The two-day conference is taking place in Cork and started with a though provoking keynote by Ewa Mazierska, after which I attended two great panels about women on and behind the screen. The first day was finished by a screening of Pat Collins’s 2012 film Silence. I’m curious what tomorrow will bring, with a.o. a keynote by Chris Wahl and a presentation by Eduard Cuelenaere on our Dutch-Flemish remakes research … More information on the programme etc. can be found here.

Cork 3

Conference on Multivoicedness & European cinema

I’m very excited to announce the conference Multivoicedness and European Cinema: Representation, Industry, Politics! I’m organizing this conference as chair of the Film Studies section of ECREA, together with my colleagues Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork), Sergio Villanueva Baselga (Universitat de Barcelona), Helle Kannik Haastrup (University of Copenhagen) and Anders Marklund (University of Lund). The conference will take place in Cork on 10 and 11 November 2017. Here’s a link to the conference website, and I copy the Call for Papers below:

 

CFP Multivoicedness and European Cinema: Representation, Industry, Politics

Conference date: Friday 10th and Saturday 11th November 2017

Venue: University College Cork, Ireland

Organised by: ECREA Film Studies Section

Deadline for abstracts: 2 May 2017

Conference website: https://ecreafilmstudies2017.wordpress.com
European cinema has evolved from a homogenous and selective object of study, mostly shaped by frameworks of national industry, identity and culture, to a much more diversified field, reflecting the shift to a post-colonial, post-communist, post-national, globalised Europe. In the context of an increasingly diverse but also split society, in which social polarisation is on the increase due to the crisis of the Eurozone and the decline of the welfare states, and in which populism and nationalisms are on the rise, resulting in the strengthening of the Fortress Europe project, this conference aims to turn the spotlight on the less-represented and less-audible voices in European cinema in all its forms: fiction, documentary, mainstream, art house, independent, exploitation, art film. With an inclusive focus encompassing issues of production, distribution and reception, of representation and of form, of dissent and of control, the conference invites contributions that engage from a wide range of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches with the politics of difference and with the representation and/or expression of alternative viewpoints in European films / in films made in Europe.

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Ewa Mazierska (University of Central Lancashire)

Professor Chris Wahl (Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf)

 

Abstracts are invited on topics related to Multivoicedness in European Cinema, including but not limited to:

  • Multivoicedness in national and transnational European cinemas
  • Peripheries, borders, and grey areas: falling between the cracks, speaking from the margins
  • Ethics and/or aesthetics of alternative voices
  • Audiodescription, subtitling and dubbing of multivoiced films
  • Cultural and market negotiations: translating cultures, crossing borders
  • Participation, dissent, resistance: audiences, politics, and public discourse
  • Alternative European cinemas and the global market
  • Other voices: niche markets, new forms of consumption
  • Deterritorialising identities, becoming migrant/minoritarian
  • Polyglot cinema: speaking from multiple subject positions
  • Genders and genres: decentering and in-betweenness
  • Alternative film festivals and other cinemas
  • Speaking in tongues: the audiences of multivoiced films
  • Queering European cinema
  • Nonfiction and commitment: documenting the silenced subject
  • Speaking for oneself: multiple forms of first-person filmmaking
  • Transnational, cosmopolitan, global: what European cinema?
  • A continent in motion: multiple commitments, divided belongings
  • The “New Europeans” in films / making films
  • Margins of industrial practices, alternative forms of production, distribution and reception
  • Speaking parts: person, character, actor, star

The conference will also be the host to special panel sections prepared by the HoMER network (History of Moviegoing, Exhibition and Reception) and FFRN (Film Festival Research network). 

Abstract submission: Please submit your abstract (max 300 words) along with key references, institutional affiliation and a short bio (max 150 words) or a panel proposal, including a panel presentation (max 300 words) along with minimum 3, maximum 4 individual abstracts.

Submission deadline: May 2nd 2017.

Proposal acceptance notification: June 23rd 2017.

Please send your abstract/panel proposals to the conference email address: filmstudiesecrea@gmail.com

Submissions for the HoMER section should be sent to Daniela Treveri Gennari: dtreveri-gennari@brookes.ac.uk and submissions for the FFRN section should be sent to Skadi Loist: skadi.loist@uni-rostock.de.

ECREA membership is not required to participate in the conference. Delegates will be required to contribute towards administrative and catering costs.

Conference details: The Conference is hosted and supported by the Department of Film and Screen Media, University College of Cork, Ireland: http://www.ucc.ie/en/filmstudies/

Conference organisers: Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork), Sergio Villanueva Baselga (Universitat de Barcelona), Helle Kannik Haastrup (University of Copenhagen), Anders Marklund (University of Lund), Gertjan Willems (Ghent University).

Conference email address: filmstudiesecrea@gmail.com

Conference website: https://ecreafilmstudies2017.wordpress.com

Reframing the remake

Rip-Off or Resourceful Creativity? is the title of the latest special issue (edited by Sarah Smyth and Connor McMorran) of the Frames Cinema Journal, focusing on remakes. It features an article called Reframing the remake: Dutch-Flemish monolingual remakes and their theoretical and conceptual implications, by Eduard Cuelenaere, Stijn Joye and myself. The article offers some first theoretical reflections on remakes and the academic field of remake studies, stemming from our recently started research project on Dutch-Flemish remakes (cf. this previous blog post). You can read the article at full length here.

reframing-the-remake-frames

In the article, we explicitly take distance from ‘anti-remake debates’ offering a normative standpoint towards remakes. We instead aim for a more nuanced reading of the remake practice. Our argument is based upon an examination of Dutch-Flemish remakes, which proves to be an original contribution to the field of remake studies, as well as an excellent exemplar in the context of the deconstruction and reframing of discourses about the global remake practice. As a first step, we claim that the non-commercial aura of the European remake should be revisited because the Dutch-Flemish monolingual remakes clearly disclose a similar incentive to the one that often inspires Hollywood remakes: financial gains. Furthermore, our case underlines the need for a more nuanced understanding of intercultural media practices, including the cultural proximity theory. Lastly, we reveal a remarkable discrepancy between the essentialist conception of cultural identity—that is put forward by remake directors—and the constructionist conception, which is dominant in scholarly discussions.

Book review on European cinema

The Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television has just published its latest issue, including a book review I wrote on the academic reader The Europeanness of European cinema: identity, meaning, globalization. Edited by Mary Harrod, Mariana Liz and Alissa Timoshkina, this new anthology on the fast evolving area of European cinema, offering some of the most recent scholarly insights and reflections on current hot issues, is most welcome. You can read the book review here.

Book cover of The Europeanness of European cinema